“it is 9/11 today. last night, after long rehearsal (refine! rebuild! reuse! recycle!), i attended a party meant to celebrate “fashion” where i felt woefully out of place. i, however, am not one to look a gift horse full of champagne in the mouth. so i grabbed a couple and began chatting up the most interesting looking person in the room. mike. a retired NYPD policeman formerly of the 13th precinct, guarding an empty table adorned with pop-culture detritus, now hired to do private security at functions where people like me feel woefully out of place. he was quick to laugh, easy to talk to, and could tell a story that had me alternating between stitches and tears. like a benevolent boxer who knows when to jab with humor and then land a right hook of poignance. (my father taught me how to box, which i had to stop for obvious guitar-hand-related reasons.) i asked him the questions every retired police officer must get: “what’s the craziest thing you’ve ever seen?” “have you ever been shot at?”, etc. he said his favorite part of being on the force was being able to help people. starting the healing process. soon enough, he got to telling me about his experience of 9/11. how a female police officer from his precinct was the first to call in that a plane had hit the first tower. how the dispatch said, “what? a train?!” she perished that day while saving new yorker’s lives. how, when he and the other men and women in uniform raced down to the towers, pedestrians cheered them on, even chasing their squad cars to throw in water and protein bars. he said that he used to fret about money and retirement plans and 401ks, but that after 9/11, he realized the only thing that mattered is being with the people you love and being happy. so cheers to you, mike. cheers to you all.”
— Annie Clark (via metamorpphosis)
sirsmithcup:

first two panels = my life
sirsmithcup:

first two panels = my life
sirsmithcup:

first two panels = my life
sirsmithcup:

first two panels = my life
sirsmithcup:

first two panels = my life
“How can I begin anything new with all of yesterday in me?”
— Leonard Cohen, Beautiful Losers (via teenager90s)

(via brightclear)

“I think about dying but I don’t want to die. Not even close. In fact my problem is the complete opposite. I want to live, I want to escape. I feel trapped and bored and claustrophobic. There’s so much to see and so much to do but I somehow still find myself doing nothing at all. I’m still here in this metaphorical bubble of existence and I can’t quite figure out what the hell I’m doing or how to get out of it.”
Matty Healy. (via maddywirtz)

(via brightclear)

fluffymb:

The moment when the table turns.
fluffymb:

The moment when the table turns.
fluffymb:

The moment when the table turns.

fluffymb:

The moment when the table turns.

(via hysterical-strength16)

impossible-grinning-soul:

Biking day in New York City for Mr. Byrne
impossible-grinning-soul:

Biking day in New York City for Mr. Byrne
impossible-grinning-soul:

Biking day in New York City for Mr. Byrne
impossible-grinning-soul:

Biking day in New York City for Mr. Byrne

destielfricklefrackle:

have you ever had to restart a song because you spaced out and weren’t appreciating it enough

(via hopefullyitsnotfaul)

“I always had a repulsive need to be something more than human.”
— David Bowie  (via un-exotic)

(via brightclear)

“And then I got to a point where I just started realizing that you just embrace the fact that it’s uncomfortable and be uncomfortable and just let that be the thing you do. So I never worry too much - - the awkward silences or failed banter that’s not funny, and I’ve been referred to as compared to Rainman on stage which was - - I understand it because I don’t look, I look like I’m a little bit, just really awkward. But I think it’s like, after a while it’s like, that’s fine, you know? That’s an okay thing to be. You don’t have to be cool or charming or funny.”
“When you become comfortable with uncertainty, infinite possibilities open up in your life… fear is no longer a dominant factor in what you do, and no longer prevents you from taking action to initiate change”
— Eckhart Tolle (via theriverjordyn)

(via brightclear)